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Prince Harry leaves the armed forces

Prince Harry at Trooping the Colour 2013
After a decade of serving the armed forces, Prince Harry finally decided it is time to go. In a statement, the prince said:

"After a decade of service, moving on from the Army has been a really tough decision.  I consider myself incredibly lucky to have had the chance to do some very challenging jobs and have met many fantastic people in the process. From learning the hard way to stay onside with my Colour Sergeant at Sandhurst, to the incredible people I served with during two tours in Afghanistan - the experiences I have had over the last 10 years will stay with me for the rest of my life. For that I will always be hugely grateful.

Inevitably most good things come to an end and I am at a crossroads in my military career. Luckily for me, I will continue to wear the uniform and mix with fellow servicemen and women for the rest of my life, helping where I can, and making sure the next few Invictus Games are as amazing as the last.
I am considering the options for the future and I am really excited about the possibilities. Spending time with the Australian Defence Force will be incredible and I know I will learn a lot. I am also looking forward to coming back to London this summer to continue working at the Personnel Recovery Unit.

So while I am finishing one part of my life, I am getting straight into a new chapter. I am really looking forward to it."

Following his education at Eton and a gap year in Australia and Lesotho, Prince Harry decided to enter the military, undergoing officer training at Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in 2005. He was commissioned as a Cornet into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment, serving temporarily with his brother, and completed his training as a troop leader. In 2007–2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan, but had to be pulled out after an Australian magazine leaked his service there. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012–2013 with the Army Air Corps.


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