These 3 Private Residences of the Dutch Royal Family Will Make You Want to Say “Mooi!”

As Sovereign of the Netherlands, King Willem-Alexander has on his disposal three state-owned palaces: the Royal Palace in Amsterdam, which is used for entertaining and official functions, the Noordeinde Palace, which serves as the king’s workplace, and Huis ten Bosch, the king’s principal residence. But there’s more. The Dutch Royal Family also owns impressive residences. Remember these are privately owned by the House of Orange.  They’re not only homey but definitely impressive and you’ll definitely fall in love once you see them!

Villa Eikenhorst and the De Hosten Estates

Villa Eikenhorst. Image: Wikimapia

The property has been in the ownership of the House of Orange since 1845. Prince Frederik, the second son of King Willem I,  purchased the estate and had it landscaped by landscape architects Petzold and Zocher. After his death, it was passed on to his daughter Marie von Wied until Queen Wilhelmina purchased the property. Here, Queen Wilhelmina would spend her quiet time painting. The property passed to Queen Juliana after her death. The 17th century farmhouse-inspired Villa Eikenhorst in the estate grounds was built between 1985 to 1987. Since 2003, it serves as home to King Willem-Alexander, Queen Maxima and their children.  Until 1996, Queen Beatrix’s younger sister Princess Christina lived here until they vacated the place for renovation.



Drakensteyn Castle

Drakensteyn Castle

The private home of Princess Beatrix, Drakensteyn was built from 1640–1643 and was purchased by the princess from the Bosch family in 1959. This served as the home of her family until she became Queen in 1981, when the royal family had to move to The Hague. She returned to the castle after her abdication.

Villa Rocco dei Dragoni

Villa Rocco dei Dragoni

Villa Rocco dei Dragoni is a private family estate in Tavernelle, Italy. The property was bought by Princess Beatrix and Prince Claus for their three sons in 1975. The former owner was the Count De Vicini, who also owns 600 hectares of land in the area which is used for raising olives and for the production of Chanti Classico.


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