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These 7 British Princesses Remained Unmarried All Their Lives

Princess Amelia Sophia of Great Britain by Jean Baptist van Loo.
Image: Wikimedia
These princesses got all the money and attention on earth but they decided to live the life of single blessedness. Meet the seven British princesses who remained unmarried and, instead, dutifully fulfilled their royal obligations.
Princess Amelia Sophia Eleanor (1711-1786)

The second and last surviving child of King George II, she was the criticized by artists of her era, such as Lord Herby and Lady Pomfret. She was called "one of the oddest princesses that ever was known” because Amelia disliked flattery and had a “heart open to honesty." She closed Richmond Park from public when she became its ranger in 1751, although she later lifted the restrictions. She also supported charitable organizations during her lifetime.

Princess Caroline Elizabeth (1713-1757)

The fourth child and second daughter of King George II, she was the favorite of her mother, Queen Caroline, and was known as "the truth-telling Caroline Elizabeth." Her parents always summoned her if they want to know the truth when her siblings were in disagreement. Her unhappiness in the later years of her life was caused by her great love for to the married courtier Lord Hervey.

Princess Caroline Elizabeth by Jacopo Amigoni. Image: Wikimedia.

Princess Augusta Sophia (1768-1840)

She was the sixth child and second daughter of George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Augusta died unmarried because of her parent's reluctance to see their daughters tie the knot. She was supposed to marry his cousin, the future Frederick VI of Denmark, but King George III would never hear of it. He never wanted any British princess to marry into Danish royalty after her younger sister's horrible treatment by the prince's father, King Christian VII.

Princess Augusta Sophia. Image: Wikimedia

Princess Sophia Matilda (1777-1848)

The twelfth child and sixth daughter of King George III, the princess was closest to her father and, just like her sisters, was raised in a very sheltered environment. An unfounded rumor had it that she bore an illegitimate son by her father's equerry, Thomas Garth. Other rumors spread that she was raped by her own brother, the Duke of Cumberland. She later lived next to her niece, the future Queen Victoria, in Kensington Palace. She fell under the spell of Sir John Conroy, comptroller of the Duchess of Kent's household, who squandered her money.

Princess Sophia Matilda by Lawrence. Image: Wikipedia

Princess Amelia (1783-1810)

The youngest daughter and child of King George III, she was in poor health most of her life. Her death took a heavy blow on King George III, whose health eventually declined and became insane.

Princess Amelia. Image: Wikipedia.

Princess Victoria Alexandra Olga Mary (1868-1935)

Princess Victoria was the fourth child and second daughter of King Edward VII and Princess Alexandra of Denmark. Though she had numerous royal suitors, it is believer that her mother discouraged her from marrying. She became her parents' companion until their death. His brother King George V, who was greatly attached to her, took her death seriously that he died afterwards in 1936.

Princess Victoria. Image: Wikipedia

Princess Helena Victoria (1870-1948)

The daughter of Princess Helena, fifth child and third daughter of Queen Victoria, and Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein, Helena Victoria decided not to marry, choosing, instead, to her mother's footsteps and spent her life working on behalf of various organizations.

Princess Helena Victoria. Image: Wikimedia.



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