The British Royal Family is UK's Top Tourism Draw

The British Royal Family. Image: Wikimedia

The British Royal Family is a top tourism draw that’s difficult to knock down from the No. 1 spot. Since the 2012 Olympics, U.S. visit to London has seen a steady increase by 2.3 million American visitors. That’s a rise of 11 per cent from 2012 according to the data from London & Partners, the Mayor’s promotional company.

It appears that these Americans are willing to pay money and go the extra just to tick off their travel list—get a glimpse of the beloved Royal Family. And would you believe the Queen is their No. 1 most preferred “dream tour guide”? But in her absence, Princes William or Harry or the Duchess of Cambridge would suffice enough.  Adele and David Beckham are also considered as dream tour guides but they can’t beat the majesty that these royals have to offer.


Of course, there’s the list of royal-related spots that Americans want to see, including Buckingham Palace, where the Queen lives, and the Tower of London, where Her Majesty’s precious Crown Jewels kept.

The Duchess of Cambridge, meanwhile, holds a special place among the royal-curious Americans. A survey by Booking.com found out that beloved Kate is the British person that Americans are most eager to see. Coming close to her is no other than the Queen herself, followed by the Spice Girls.
If the British Royal Family is ever to be considered as a corporate entity, it surely is a very profitable firm, since it directly brings it billions of pounds to the treasure and is even more value for money than  any republican president—executive or non-executive alike.



“The Monarchy is a powerful endorsement for individual and company brands and for the nation brand. We believe that it is making a significant contribution to the task of driving Britain out of recession,” said the financial consultancy firm Brand Finance.

The firm reports that the Royal family brings in about half a billion pounds every year not to mention the “intangible asset in perpetuity” worth £16 billion.

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