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12 More Chateaux in the Loire Valley: Part 2

Palais ducal de Nevers, one of the most imposing French chateaux. Image: Wikimedia Commons

A few months ago, I have written about 10 French chateaux that you might find interesting to visit in the Loire Valley. Here are 12 more breathtaking chateaux to catch your imagination!

 Palais ducal de Nevers

Ducal Palace of Nevers is a residence castle of the 15th and 16th centuries of counts and dukes of Nevers. In the list of 1840, it is classified as a historical monument.

1 Place de l'Hôtel de ville
58000 Nevers
France
Tel. +33 3 86 68 46 13

Château de Brézé

This small, dry-moated castle in Brézé is known for the wines produced here. It is still home to the descendants of the ancient lords that have since owned the place. The château is a listed ancient monument originally dating from 1060. 

2 Rue du Château
49260 Brézé, France
Tel. +33 2 41 51 60 15

Château de Brézé

Château de Brissac

The Château de Brissac is hailed as the tallest chateau in France. It is still owned by the family of the dukes of Brissac. 

49320 Brissac en Loire
France
Tel. +33 2 41 91 22 21

Château de Brissac

Clos Lucé

Leonardo da Vinci spent the last three years of his life at Close Luce, dying there on May 2, 1519. Today, the chateau houses the Leonardo da Vinci Museum, which features forty models of the various machines designed by the great scientist and a copy of the Mona Lisa, painted in 1654 by Ambroise Dubois.

2, rue du Clos Lucé
37400 Amboise
Val de Loire
France
Tel. +33 2 47 57 00 73

Clos Lucé


Château du Lude

Le Lude is the most northerly chateau of the Loire Valley and still one of the few chateaus inhabited by the same family for the last 260 years. Its famous gardens attract thousands of guests every year.

4, Rue Jehan de Daillon
72800 Le Lude,
Tel. +33 (0)2 43 94 60 09

Château du Lude


Château de Meillant

Built in the 15th century, Château de Meillant is famnous for the Tour du Lion and is listed as a official monument since 1963.  

1 Rue d'Uzay
18200 Meillant
France
Tel. +33 2 48 63 32 05

Château de Meillant


Château de Montsoreau

The Château de Montsoreau is a Renaissance-style castle  best remembered today as the setting of Alexandre Dumas’ novel La Dame de Monsoreau .

Passage du Marquis de Geoffre
49730 Montsoreau
France
Tel. +33 2 41 67 12 60

Château de Montsoreau

Château de Sully-sur-Loire

Once a fortified castle, Château de Sully-sur-Loire  was converted into a palatial seigneurial residence of the dukes of Sully.  The family retained possession of the castle until 1962 when ownership was transferred to the Département du Loiret. Every June, the castle hosts a music festival and is famous for the tapestries, paintings  and furnishings of the Sullys.  

Chemin de la Salle Verte
45600 Sully-sur-Loire
France
Tel. +33 2 38 36 36 86

Château de Sully-sur-Loire


Château d'Ussé

Château d'Ussé was immortalized as Charles Perrault’s inspiration when he was writing "The Sleeping Beauty." The chateau was also the subject of a French railroad poster issued by the Chemin de Fer de Paris à Orléans.  Walt Disney also looked to this chateau when he created many of the Disney Castles.

37420 Rigny-Ussé
France
Tel. +33 2 47 95 54 05

Château d'Ussé


Château de Valençay

The d'Estampes and Talleyrand-Périgord families still call Château de Valençay their home up to this day. George Sand called it"one of the most beautiful on earth" that "no king has owned a more picturesque park".  

2 Rue de Blois
36600 Valençay
France
Tel. +33 2 54 00 10 66

Château de Valençay


Château de Villandry

The Château de Villandry is celebrated for its famous Renaissance gardens, which boast of a water garden, ornamental flower gardens, and vegetable gardens.

3 Rue Principale
37510 Villandry
France
Tel. +33 2 47 50 02 09

Château de Villandry


Château de Villandry

Château d'Azay-le-Ferron attracts guests from all over the world for its French gardens dating back to the 17th century and improved constantly through the centuries. The chateau also boasts of an imposing interior. Owned by the city of Tours, it is open to the public.  

31/33 rue Hersent-Luzarche
36290 Azay-la-Ferron
Tél : +33 2 54 39 20 06


Château de Villandry


All images are from Wikimedia Commons. 

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